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Quantum theory : a very short introduction / John Polkinghorne.

By: Polkinghorne, J. C., (John C.), 1930-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Very short introductions 69.Copyright date: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press , 2002Edition: First Edition.Description: 113 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.ISBN: 0192802526; 9780192802521.Subject(s): Quantum theory | Teoría cuánticaDDC classification: 530.12 Online resources: Publisher description | Table of contents only | Contributor biographical information
Partial contents:
1. Classical cracks -- 2. The light dawns -- 3. Darkening Perplexities -- 4. Further developments -- 5. Togetherness -- 6. Lessons and meanings.
Abstract: Quantum Theory is the most revolutionary discovery in physics since Newton. This book gives a lucid, exciting, and accessible account of the surprising and counterintuitive ideas that shape our understanding of the sub-atomic world. It does not disguise the problems of interpretation that still remain unsettled 75 years after the initial discoveries. The main text makes no use of equations, but there is a Mathematical Appendix for those desiring stronger fare. Uncertainty, probabilistic physics, complementarity, the problematic character of measurement, and decoherence are among the many topics discussed.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Item holds
Libro académico Libro académico Biblioteca del Campus
530.12 P7699q 2002 (Browse shelf) Ej. 1 Available
Total holds: 0

Includes index.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 93-94).

1. Classical cracks -- 2. The light dawns -- 3. Darkening Perplexities -- 4. Further developments -- 5. Togetherness -- 6. Lessons and meanings.

Quantum Theory is the most revolutionary discovery in physics since Newton. This book gives a lucid, exciting, and accessible account of the surprising and counterintuitive ideas that shape our understanding of the sub-atomic world. It does not disguise the problems of interpretation that still remain unsettled 75 years after the initial discoveries. The main text makes no use of equations, but there is a Mathematical Appendix for those desiring stronger fare. Uncertainty, probabilistic physics, complementarity, the problematic character of measurement, and decoherence are among the many topics discussed.

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